Posts by Steph Clarke

How can big organisations play their part in local food supply?

Margaret Harris of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital attended this evening and told us of an initiative her colleague Antony Cobley has been putting into place at the hospital. Fresh food stalls and fruit trees planted in the hospital grounds – here she tells us more…

 

 


Questions and comments from the floor

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Some comments paraphrased from the floor in response to the previous presentations

“I applied to open a eco friendly vegetarian coffee shop in birmingham and we lost to property and now we’re going to get another kebab shop. What would help the most is knowing who to go to who to talk to in the council to make eco and green projects happen. “

“Planning is a difficult area – but we have managed to turn down applications for fast food shops in Birmingham – and we’re going to have the healthy choices scheme to help shops who want to offer healthier choices.”

“Part of the scandal is price differential  in areas – Tesco price more at shops that people walk to than the ones we drive to yet the gain PR by giving to food banks!”

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Liz Dowler: Professor of Food and Social Policy at the University of Warwick

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Elizabeth Dowler, Professor of Food and Social Policy at the University of Warwick, and a member of the food ethics council,  was recently involved in headline-creating research into food aid and food poverty for Defra.

Liz is here to respond to the first two talks…

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Adrian Phillips: Director of Birmingham Public Health Profit and health

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Adrian Phillips  Birmingham’s Director of Public Health. The main food-related public health issues that occur to me, are food access and obesity:

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Chris Mould: Executive Chair, Trussell Trust – Food Banks on the increase

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Chris Mould heads The Trussell Trust, whose food banks fed 913,138 people across the UK last year , 330,205 of which were children . The Trust were recently inundated with donations in response to a rather nasty Mail on Sunday article.  Benefit payment cuts and delays were a major cause of the 51% increase in food bank visits over the last year – causing over 500 UK clergy to write in protest to the Government.

This cause of food poverty is, quite simply, a general one of financial hardship, with food or heating being the choice people were often forced to make over winter.

Food Banks offer more than just food, they offer a listening ear, time and signposted to other services – but food costs have risen dramatically in last few years – faster than all other commodities so is it ant wonder that use of Food Banks have risen.

People are spending more on food but actually leaving the shops with less. – People often don’t need much help, about 65% of people need one off support in a 6month period.

Charlotte is a foodbank user who was in foster care – when she moved but of care she struggled, going hungry with no support from other services. Without a Food Bank she doesn’t know what she would have done. 

How can we expect people to afford living costs when 1 in 5 are not paid living wage?

 


Food and our Future in the West Midlands

This evening we are at the Nishkam Centre attending the Lunar Societies event looking at food Poverty in the West Midlands.

Event Speakers include

Chris Mould: Executive Chair, Trussell Trust
Adrian Phillips: Director of Birmingham Public Health
also: Liz Dowler: Professor of Food and Social Policy at the University of Warwick

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#BrumElliott – Today’s event in pictures

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Table notes - on the table clothes

Session 3 post its

Elliot Review Birmingham

Elliot Review Birmingham

Elliot Review Birmingham


The Elliott Review Birmingham: Session 3 What are the answers?

These are my notes from Table 2 at the Elliott Review Birmingham event exploring exploring what Birmingham can do to tackle food crime. At this table are representatives from a cross section of people from the food industry, retailers, restaurateurs, academics etc. The question they’re discussing is:

Birmingham the eyes and ears for the UK?

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The Elliott Review Birmingham; Session 2 Crime Free food Networks and Culture change

These are my notes from Table 2 at the Elliott Review Birmingham event exploring exploring what Birmingham can do to tackle food crime. At this table are representatives from a cross section of people from the food industry, retailers, restaurateurs, academics etc. The question they’re discussing is:

Imagine it’s April 2017 and there is NO food crime anymore – What does the ideal scenario look like?

Continue reading “The Elliott Review Birmingham; Session 2 Crime Free food Networks and Culture change”


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